4. CHRISTMAS ON OXFORD STREET

Be honest, any time of the year when you visit London, you’ll want to visit Oxford to melt some bank cards. But in December, London’s iconic shopping district was completely changed – thanks to thousands of light bulbs hanging overhead and illuminating the street like huge, shiny snowballs.

More delicate and wonderful than the silver fair feathers that lit Bond Street this year and just across the street, the sky above Regent Street shimmered with sequins, gears and gold coils. #ecstatic

5. SOUTHBANK’S WINTER FESTIVAL

If you’re looking for something interesting to do in London, the Southbank Center is always guaranteed to have something going on, so it’s no surprise that the winter festival here is nothing but great.

The bars and restaurants in the open market along the banks of the River Thames, filled with the air with irresistible scents will make you fill your stomach with hot hotdogs, meat pies and fruits Christmas tradition is delicious, and a few cups of wine are heated.

Also, don’t forget to pick some of the last Christmas gifts from the craft stalls in the market, warm yourself up with a campfire in Scandinavian wooden lodges or listen to the Philharmonic orchestra perform the songs Traditional Christmas sing.

6. VISIT CHRISTMAS tree AT TRAFALGAR Square

Discover London’s largest Christmas tree at Trafalgar Square – with a height of more than 20m, and must use a hydraulic crane to decorate. This huge Norwegian pine tree has appeared every year since 1947.

This was a gift from Oslo: a “thank you” from Norway for British support during World War II. The current pine tree that impresses with the crowd is a symbol of friendship, and that is undoubtedly the largest Christmas tree you will see this season.

7. COME TO THE RIVER AT THE TIME OF DELIVERY

Of course, Christmas is not all about winter: New Year is also creeping into every corner, and London is not half-heartedly celebrating the New Year. Pull yourself out of every ongoing festival to see fireworks along the banks of the River Thames at midnight. Even under the London Eyes Wheel, the cannon looked like colored bands erupting from bubbles.